Blogpost #12: Reflection on Class and Social Media Influencers

Last week in Class, we talked all about Webinars and the upcoming assignment. It was interesting to hear about people’s bad experiences with webinars. There were some that didn’t have pictures, some that seemed jumbled, and some that seemed the only purpose was to sell a book.  I found this surprising – I always imagined people who did webinars were super professional and everything always went right, and that they were hear to teach about something or encourage professional development. But there’s many different forms of webinars and not all of them are good, interesting, or seem like they ever needed to exist in the first place.

As we learned from Kristin this night in class, so many things can go wrong and you kind of just have to roll with the punches. It’s interesting because as someone who is generally uncomfortable speaking in front of groups, doing a webinar is much preferable for me and even if things go wrong, it would be easier for me to cope with than things “going wrong” in an in-person setting. Nobody can see the panic on my face. Everything is fine.

But also there’s so many steps that you have to take into consideration when using technology. Make sure you have access to internet/an outlet. Make sure you are in a location where you will be heard clearly. Make sure your slides are going to match up with what your saying (this is obviously applicable to in-person too, but you’re really relying on slides as your only visual aid so it seems extra important). Log on 30 minutes before hand to make sure the software feels like working that day – if not, you need to have some alternative available.

Even with all of this extra crap you have to think about that you wouldn’t necessarily need to think about in person, I feel more prepared to improvise from the other side of a screen.

I don’t necessarily  feel like I have developed my “specialty” area yet, and I am also extremely undecided if I want to be an academic library or transition over to public libraries. I am mostly just excited to figure that out as I go along.

With that said, I tried to find different types of librarians and archivists who have perspectives in something that peaks my interest.

Matt Imrie, Teen Librarian:

 

 

 

 

Blog:

http://teenlibrarian.co.uk/

Meg Metcalf: Feminist Librarian

 

 

 

Blog:

https://www.feministlibrarian.co/

Chris Bourg, Non-Neutral Librarian

 

 

Blog:

https://chrisbourg.wordpress.com/

Christian Lauersen, Non-Neutral Librarian

https://twitter.com/clauersen

https://christianlauersen.net/about/

For my last one, I was interested in finding a librarian who utilizes Snapchat professionally. I ended up finding this padlet site for librarians with snapchat: https://padlet.com/shannonmmiller/snapchatlibrarians

And I explored a few of the people there. ]

I’m posting about Paige Alfonzo, just because she also happened to be the creator of another web page I found when I was searching for Snapchat librarians:

https://librarianenumerations.wordpress.com/author/bilbobaggins530/

 

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6 thoughts on “Blogpost #12: Reflection on Class and Social Media Influencers

  1. It’s so interesting that you found librarians with professional snapchats! I poked around for those types of influencers but had a hard time finding things. I’m looking forward to checking out some of the snapchats on the list you linked!

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  2. I feel the exact opposite when it comes to things going wrong during a webinar! I would much rather prefer a technical issue in front of a group of people or messing up during public speaking because I feel people are more forgiving in person than online. If something goes wrong during a webinar, people are much more willing to harshly criticize you because, well, it’s the internet! You have that anonymity plus that higher expectation because it’s such a contained environment. In addition, people empathize more during an in-person public speaking fiasco because people relate to that nightmare scenario too. I think there’s less empathy from folks if you screw up during a scripted webinar session.

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  3. The Snapchat thing is fascinating! I know almost nothing about Snapchat and have never used it, so I want to know everything! If you’ve explored it at all, how would you say librarians are tending to use Snapchat? Is it more for connecting with patrons or do they use it to connect to each other as well? I can definitely see the patron side of things (I guess it’s what the young people use :p), but do librarians also use it to interact with each other? I’ll be looking through that Padlet as well.

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  4. I agree with Russel about having unexpected issues in person vs. online. I also think there’s less pressure in person because a person is less likely to stand up and leave the room if it takes a couple minutes to get your projector working, while an anonymous name on an internet screenshare might just give up and leave if there are technical difficulties. I also found a couple of webinars with very poor sound quality (which I abandoned for that reason). I think part of it might be that everyone has all the equipment necessary for a webinar built right into their computer (mostly, a microphone and a camera), but that built-in equipment isn’t always particularly good. So while good webinars clearly think about the quality of the equipment, I’d bet that the wide availability of random equipment probably increases the number of webinars out there with poor sound.

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  5. Whoa this is such an incredible listing of folks, thank you for this! “queeriodicals” is absolute genius (and I am very appreciative of any social media presence that combines essays on feminism with photos of cute cats + dogs). Also, re: Matt Irme, I’m realizing that I am very disconnected from teen librarianship. When I used to work a bit in public libraries, I definitely admired but struggled to connect with teens, mostly because I was just very uncomfortable with myself at that time in my life. I wonder what it would be like now to work with teens in a library setting… I suppose there will be some older teen undergrads working in an academic library setting, but it seems like a very different moment to engage young folks! Anyways, great links and great source of ideas 🙂

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